Now Playing Tracks

The layout is stemmed from the photography in this spread. “The sounds” grab my attention immediately and as I go down the list underneath it, they seem to be laid out in a manner that they are coming from the girls mind. Maybe the girl in the photo is the creator of these “sounds” or just a listener of them. The smaller text on the right is laid right by her mouth and these may be words she spoke. The paragraph sits directly next to the sentence “you’ve got this strange effect on me” which looks really cool vertically aligned. But it is placed a little too close to her chin which forms this conflicting tangent. By taking up the whole page it emphasizes the quote and also balances the text on the left page. Also the one word that is floating by her nose is placed in a cool position, which makes it look like she is staring directly at it.

The color plays an important part of this layout as well because it enables all of the white text to be read with ease. Also it has a sort of dreamy effect to it that reinforces the girls day dream like expression. Overall this is a very strong layout where all the parts of it work together to form a design that communicates and looks stylish.

This designer utilized the modular grid to create a very eye catching layout. I like how the large photo on top takes up the whole width of the page. The overlaid text in the middle of the photo sets the style for many other “headers” within the design. After that photo the page is split into womens and mens sections which is then divided into two columns each. The alteration of photo with text, color block with text, just photo, and just text is visually awesome! It keeps the design fresh and even though everything consists of a square the layout does not get boring.

The placement of the colors also play a huge part in this successful layout. I believe the sea green is balanced properly throughout, with neither side looking too heavy. The placement of the text is very important as well. Every line of text is balanced within the squares and the negative space within looks proper. Perfect example of utilizing every square inch of your grid.

You know its a solid layout when the photo doesn’t show everything but you still love it. The title sets the mood for this design. Vertical gardens is a very tall font with the “L” continuing to the end of the paper in a Bauhaus style. This emphasizes the word “vertical” and makes for a great yellow rectangle on the left which contains words that are vertically stacked upon one another. Then on the right the photos are styled in the same vertical way, Each containing a picture that showcases these vertical gardens. The messages above the numbers are set vertically and once again reinforce the idea of going up.
As for the paragraphs, the columnar design is perfect. Using 4 tall columns to lay the text out once again refers back to the idea of vertical gardening. The headers are easily read and the word count per line is just about right. The only thing that I would work with are the rags on the paragraphs. Some of them are a little too uneven. Besides that, the design is great and I might just start a vertical garden because of this article.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS 1000D
ISO
200
Aperture
f/5
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
28mm

You know its a solid layout when the photo doesn’t show everything but you still love it. The title sets the mood for this design. Vertical gardens is a very tall font with the “L” continuing to the end of the paper in a Bauhaus style. This emphasizes the word “vertical” and makes for a great yellow rectangle on the left which contains words that are vertically stacked upon one another. Then on the right the photos are styled in the same vertical way, Each containing a picture that showcases these vertical gardens. The messages above the numbers are set vertically and once again reinforce the idea of going up.

As for the paragraphs, the columnar design is perfect. Using 4 tall columns to lay the text out once again refers back to the idea of vertical gardening. The headers are easily read and the word count per line is just about right. The only thing that I would work with are the rags on the paragraphs. Some of them are a little too uneven. Besides that, the design is great and I might just start a vertical garden because of this article.

The columnar layout of this spread is easy to read and comprehend. I like how all of the information starts about an inch and a half from the top of the page which allows the it to breathe a little bit. The large grey box acts a placeholder for the bold and left aligned title. I like the placement of “danish dogme actors” in the corner of the box. I also like how the thin/black text on top of the bold/white text puts emphasis on “Danish” rather than them just being some ordinary dogme actors.

The columns for the individual actors are spaced good and I like how the designer decided to place one actor on the left page so that the other four would space out evenly on the right. Each column starts with a black horizontal line, the bold titles give you the actors name with a picture underneath it and the paragraphs begin directly underneath that. The hierarchy is clear and there is about 7 words per line which is easily readable. This whole article communicates information very effectively!

image

This article for PlayStation is awesome! The typography for “ted price” has a tech feel to it which I feel works great for a PlayStation article. The paragraphs are then lined up to the edge of the “r” and “e” in the title. The red box underneath conveys the more important information, as your eye then moves to the normal paragraph on the right. The black background contrasts with the white and red perfectly on both pages. The white lined header transitions to the next page to act as a starting point for more text. But first your eye is drawn to the large red rectangle on top which has the most important information once again. Then the bottom paragraph is read, which looks cool with the quote embedded within it. The wild and dangerous looking lines in the background of the pages gives this whole article a cutting edge feel.

The only thing I would have done differently is make the rag of the quote and ending paragraph contour to the curve of the mans arm. I don’t like the tangent that is created with the end of the quote/paragraph with his arm. There could’ve been a little more space in between the two. But still, this is a sweet spread!

Annabell Ritschel  |  http://www.behance.net/_anni_
The layout for the covers of these magazines stay consistent throughout the series. I like how the picture is the center of attention. It takes up nearly the whole entire page, except for a small strip of white on the left. I feel the white space is important because it draws your eye to the beginning of the title. The typography is thin yet strong with capital letters. The placement looks good as to how the designer laid the title across the white space and photo, all while lining up the edge of the picture with one of the letters.
As for the inside my favorite layout is the second bottom right. The typography contrasts the paragraph underneath it nicely by keeping the same dimensions. Also the photo laid across the spread at a diagonal creates a cool element with more typography in the bottom right corner to balance the spread.
My least favorite layout is the bottom right. With just one paragraph that is running off the page and all the negative space on the left, I feel that it is very un balanced and I don’t care for it.
Zoom Info
Annabell Ritschel  |  http://www.behance.net/_anni_
The layout for the covers of these magazines stay consistent throughout the series. I like how the picture is the center of attention. It takes up nearly the whole entire page, except for a small strip of white on the left. I feel the white space is important because it draws your eye to the beginning of the title. The typography is thin yet strong with capital letters. The placement looks good as to how the designer laid the title across the white space and photo, all while lining up the edge of the picture with one of the letters.
As for the inside my favorite layout is the second bottom right. The typography contrasts the paragraph underneath it nicely by keeping the same dimensions. Also the photo laid across the spread at a diagonal creates a cool element with more typography in the bottom right corner to balance the spread.
My least favorite layout is the bottom right. With just one paragraph that is running off the page and all the negative space on the left, I feel that it is very un balanced and I don’t care for it.
Zoom Info
Annabell Ritschel  |  http://www.behance.net/_anni_
The layout for the covers of these magazines stay consistent throughout the series. I like how the picture is the center of attention. It takes up nearly the whole entire page, except for a small strip of white on the left. I feel the white space is important because it draws your eye to the beginning of the title. The typography is thin yet strong with capital letters. The placement looks good as to how the designer laid the title across the white space and photo, all while lining up the edge of the picture with one of the letters.
As for the inside my favorite layout is the second bottom right. The typography contrasts the paragraph underneath it nicely by keeping the same dimensions. Also the photo laid across the spread at a diagonal creates a cool element with more typography in the bottom right corner to balance the spread.
My least favorite layout is the bottom right. With just one paragraph that is running off the page and all the negative space on the left, I feel that it is very un balanced and I don’t care for it.
Zoom Info
Annabell Ritschel  |  http://www.behance.net/_anni_
The layout for the covers of these magazines stay consistent throughout the series. I like how the picture is the center of attention. It takes up nearly the whole entire page, except for a small strip of white on the left. I feel the white space is important because it draws your eye to the beginning of the title. The typography is thin yet strong with capital letters. The placement looks good as to how the designer laid the title across the white space and photo, all while lining up the edge of the picture with one of the letters.
As for the inside my favorite layout is the second bottom right. The typography contrasts the paragraph underneath it nicely by keeping the same dimensions. Also the photo laid across the spread at a diagonal creates a cool element with more typography in the bottom right corner to balance the spread.
My least favorite layout is the bottom right. With just one paragraph that is running off the page and all the negative space on the left, I feel that it is very un balanced and I don’t care for it.
Zoom Info
Annabell Ritschel  |  http://www.behance.net/_anni_
The layout for the covers of these magazines stay consistent throughout the series. I like how the picture is the center of attention. It takes up nearly the whole entire page, except for a small strip of white on the left. I feel the white space is important because it draws your eye to the beginning of the title. The typography is thin yet strong with capital letters. The placement looks good as to how the designer laid the title across the white space and photo, all while lining up the edge of the picture with one of the letters.
As for the inside my favorite layout is the second bottom right. The typography contrasts the paragraph underneath it nicely by keeping the same dimensions. Also the photo laid across the spread at a diagonal creates a cool element with more typography in the bottom right corner to balance the spread.
My least favorite layout is the bottom right. With just one paragraph that is running off the page and all the negative space on the left, I feel that it is very un balanced and I don’t care for it.
Zoom Info
Annabell Ritschel  |  http://www.behance.net/_anni_
The layout for the covers of these magazines stay consistent throughout the series. I like how the picture is the center of attention. It takes up nearly the whole entire page, except for a small strip of white on the left. I feel the white space is important because it draws your eye to the beginning of the title. The typography is thin yet strong with capital letters. The placement looks good as to how the designer laid the title across the white space and photo, all while lining up the edge of the picture with one of the letters.
As for the inside my favorite layout is the second bottom right. The typography contrasts the paragraph underneath it nicely by keeping the same dimensions. Also the photo laid across the spread at a diagonal creates a cool element with more typography in the bottom right corner to balance the spread.
My least favorite layout is the bottom right. With just one paragraph that is running off the page and all the negative space on the left, I feel that it is very un balanced and I don’t care for it.
Zoom Info
Annabell Ritschel  |  http://www.behance.net/_anni_
The layout for the covers of these magazines stay consistent throughout the series. I like how the picture is the center of attention. It takes up nearly the whole entire page, except for a small strip of white on the left. I feel the white space is important because it draws your eye to the beginning of the title. The typography is thin yet strong with capital letters. The placement looks good as to how the designer laid the title across the white space and photo, all while lining up the edge of the picture with one of the letters.
As for the inside my favorite layout is the second bottom right. The typography contrasts the paragraph underneath it nicely by keeping the same dimensions. Also the photo laid across the spread at a diagonal creates a cool element with more typography in the bottom right corner to balance the spread.
My least favorite layout is the bottom right. With just one paragraph that is running off the page and all the negative space on the left, I feel that it is very un balanced and I don’t care for it.
Zoom Info

Annabell Ritschel http://www.behance.net/_anni_

The layout for the covers of these magazines stay consistent throughout the series. I like how the picture is the center of attention. It takes up nearly the whole entire page, except for a small strip of white on the left. I feel the white space is important because it draws your eye to the beginning of the title. The typography is thin yet strong with capital letters. The placement looks good as to how the designer laid the title across the white space and photo, all while lining up the edge of the picture with one of the letters.

As for the inside my favorite layout is the second bottom right. The typography contrasts the paragraph underneath it nicely by keeping the same dimensions. Also the photo laid across the spread at a diagonal creates a cool element with more typography in the bottom right corner to balance the spread.

My least favorite layout is the bottom right. With just one paragraph that is running off the page and all the negative space on the left, I feel that it is very un balanced and I don’t care for it.

GRIS   |   http://studio-gris.com

I love/hate it the minimalistic approach to this layout. The simplicity makes for clear and concise information, while the hierarchy that is created with the different sized paragraphs is interesting. I believe the most important information is contained within the larger paragraphs and the less important information is contained within the smaller paragraphs. The different paragraphs always contrast each other at a diagonal and the justification of them was also a good decision to keep the whole modular grid feel going.

The photos have a sense of hierarchy to them as well. With some photos taking up half the page and others very small. The paragraphs halfway laid on top of the photos is sort of odd. I think it makes for a cool visual, its just not something you see in everyday design. I like it but at some points I feel as if the text may get hard to read, such as that dark black corner. But the white text on the cover and back cover is clear and easy on the eyes. Very cool layout though.

Malary Lee   |   http://behance.net/malarylee
The layout within in this booklet is a great example of less is more. Starting with the cover the typography is laid out in a very strong manner. The font for “grammar” is very educational, then the font for “ya doin” has a live loose feel to it, and lastly the font for “it wrong” makes sure its appearance is known. Three very different fonts but they work perfect with the message they are conveying. Then the back cover makes a really cool collage of all the words people annoyingly mistake all the time. 
The layout within is very simple and bold. The horizontal type is very strong and the negative space focuses your attention of the words. The minimal layout puts a lot of emphasis onto the message the designer never wants you to forget. Nothing can or will be missed by the reader. With the importance on a just few words, this is the best way to do it. Also incorporating the fonts and color from the cover really make the design tight and the message is basically slapping me in the face telling me to smarten up!
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Malary Lee   |   http://behance.net/malarylee

The layout within in this booklet is a great example of less is more. Starting with the cover the typography is laid out in a very strong manner. The font for “grammar” is very educational, then the font for “ya doin” has a live loose feel to it, and lastly the font for “it wrong” makes sure its appearance is known. Three very different fonts but they work perfect with the message they are conveying. Then the back cover makes a really cool collage of all the words people annoyingly mistake all the time.

The layout within is very simple and bold. The horizontal type is very strong and the negative space focuses your attention of the words. The minimal layout puts a lot of emphasis onto the message the designer never wants you to forget. Nothing can or will be missed by the reader. With the importance on a just few words, this is the best way to do it. Also incorporating the fonts and color from the cover really make the design tight and the message is basically slapping me in the face telling me to smarten up!

Noémie Beaulieu    |   http://behance.net/noemiebeaulieu
Theatre de la Bordée are very eye catching! What gets my attention first is the purple and red color of the photos. It has a very deep and mysterious feel to it with all of the dark shadows and bright highlights. The sans serif typography is very modern and almost futuristic. The large letters are layed on top of the photos very consciously as to not cover up any important details in the photo. Also the white coloring makes them pop instantly and the information cannot be missed.
As for the layout inside the pamphlet I enjoy the titles of each page changing color depending on the page. The single paragraphs also change color on alternating pages and this keeps the book lively. The use of negative space looks good, everything is able to breathe. On the bottom, the three paragraphs contrast the one top paragraph nicely and once again changing colors. I’m not sure how I feel about the colored bars on the top of the pages. I think it could do with or without them. Overall this is designed great!
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Noémie Beaulieu    |   http://behance.net/noemiebeaulieu
Theatre de la Bordée are very eye catching! What gets my attention first is the purple and red color of the photos. It has a very deep and mysterious feel to it with all of the dark shadows and bright highlights. The sans serif typography is very modern and almost futuristic. The large letters are layed on top of the photos very consciously as to not cover up any important details in the photo. Also the white coloring makes them pop instantly and the information cannot be missed.
As for the layout inside the pamphlet I enjoy the titles of each page changing color depending on the page. The single paragraphs also change color on alternating pages and this keeps the book lively. The use of negative space looks good, everything is able to breathe. On the bottom, the three paragraphs contrast the one top paragraph nicely and once again changing colors. I’m not sure how I feel about the colored bars on the top of the pages. I think it could do with or without them. Overall this is designed great!
Zoom Info
Noémie Beaulieu    |   http://behance.net/noemiebeaulieu
Theatre de la Bordée are very eye catching! What gets my attention first is the purple and red color of the photos. It has a very deep and mysterious feel to it with all of the dark shadows and bright highlights. The sans serif typography is very modern and almost futuristic. The large letters are layed on top of the photos very consciously as to not cover up any important details in the photo. Also the white coloring makes them pop instantly and the information cannot be missed.
As for the layout inside the pamphlet I enjoy the titles of each page changing color depending on the page. The single paragraphs also change color on alternating pages and this keeps the book lively. The use of negative space looks good, everything is able to breathe. On the bottom, the three paragraphs contrast the one top paragraph nicely and once again changing colors. I’m not sure how I feel about the colored bars on the top of the pages. I think it could do with or without them. Overall this is designed great!
Zoom Info
Noémie Beaulieu    |   http://behance.net/noemiebeaulieu
Theatre de la Bordée are very eye catching! What gets my attention first is the purple and red color of the photos. It has a very deep and mysterious feel to it with all of the dark shadows and bright highlights. The sans serif typography is very modern and almost futuristic. The large letters are layed on top of the photos very consciously as to not cover up any important details in the photo. Also the white coloring makes them pop instantly and the information cannot be missed.
As for the layout inside the pamphlet I enjoy the titles of each page changing color depending on the page. The single paragraphs also change color on alternating pages and this keeps the book lively. The use of negative space looks good, everything is able to breathe. On the bottom, the three paragraphs contrast the one top paragraph nicely and once again changing colors. I’m not sure how I feel about the colored bars on the top of the pages. I think it could do with or without them. Overall this is designed great!
Zoom Info
Noémie Beaulieu    |   http://behance.net/noemiebeaulieu
Theatre de la Bordée are very eye catching! What gets my attention first is the purple and red color of the photos. It has a very deep and mysterious feel to it with all of the dark shadows and bright highlights. The sans serif typography is very modern and almost futuristic. The large letters are layed on top of the photos very consciously as to not cover up any important details in the photo. Also the white coloring makes them pop instantly and the information cannot be missed.
As for the layout inside the pamphlet I enjoy the titles of each page changing color depending on the page. The single paragraphs also change color on alternating pages and this keeps the book lively. The use of negative space looks good, everything is able to breathe. On the bottom, the three paragraphs contrast the one top paragraph nicely and once again changing colors. I’m not sure how I feel about the colored bars on the top of the pages. I think it could do with or without them. Overall this is designed great!
Zoom Info

Noémie Beaulieu    |   http://behance.net/noemiebeaulieu

Theatre de la Bordée are very eye catching! What gets my attention first is the purple and red color of the photos. It has a very deep and mysterious feel to it with all of the dark shadows and bright highlights. The sans serif typography is very modern and almost futuristic. The large letters are layed on top of the photos very consciously as to not cover up any important details in the photo. Also the white coloring makes them pop instantly and the information cannot be missed.

As for the layout inside the pamphlet I enjoy the titles of each page changing color depending on the page. The single paragraphs also change color on alternating pages and this keeps the book lively. The use of negative space looks good, everything is able to breathe. On the bottom, the three paragraphs contrast the one top paragraph nicely and once again changing colors. I’m not sure how I feel about the colored bars on the top of the pages. I think it could do with or without them. Overall this is designed great!

Brendan Jones   |   http://behance.net/brendanjones

The layout and design of this Google Annual Report looks great! The cover sets the design for the rest of the book with the angular pictures and opaque shapes. The use of negative space looks perfect with the title. The typography looks strong with the color spectrum throughout Google and the grey “annual report 2014” all being lined up with the L. Within the booklet the use of angular shapes sets up interesting places for text to be layed out. The rectangular paragraphs always have a good amount of negative space around them so nothing look cluttered. Also the paragraphs contrast the angular shapes nicely to create a very original layout.

Each color used for a shape or paragraph header is picked from a photo. Then at parts the colored shapes are layered on top of a photo, to create a whole new visual that keeps you excited for the next page. Even though this is a fiscal report, it has a very exciting and colorful layout that keeps the viewer wanting to read on.

Project 49 is a wine from Australia and the contemporary design reflects the grape growing and wine making process. The use of what seems to be Helvetica or a similar font of that nature, is a little boring by itself. But once illustrated, gold, grape vines are intertwined the typography takes on a whole new appearance. The vines aren’t just thrown on there either. They have a sense of balance and form as they give this label a nice shine.

The thin/hairline font for the make/year of the wine has a very modern style to it. The wide spaced kerning I believe add to that overall feel. The vertical type on the side changes up the horizontal alignment and adds an interesting element to the design. But I think the designer should of kept the font for the “project forty nine” title all caps, like the “Beechworth” type. Also maybe got rid of the illustrated bird. Overall though, I just hope the wine tastes as good as the design.

This classical looking font has taken a whole new turn. The designer has decided to disconnect all the parts of the letter from each other. The design then leaves your mind making the connections and wanting more. I have never seen a classical font designed this way and I really like it. The sharp, bold, and geometric shapes flow into each other once they are disconnected leaving your mind thinking, “should I look at each shape individually or as a whole?”

Once words are formed, even though the letters are disconnected, are clearly read. I would’ve thought separating the letters would leave to confusion in reading words, but not in this case. This modern twist on a classical font, is sure to keep this out of date font up to date.

Simple is more in the case of this Olive Oil. The large, white, “O” catches my attention immediately The use of what I would assume as being a serif font is very strong, sophisticated, and eye catching even though it is so simple. The little drip on the bottom of the “O” directly relates it to the Olive Oil and creates a sense of originality and character to an otherwise boring letter “O”.

The negative space within the “O” is a perfect place for the brand name, location, and description of the product. Containing all of the information within the “O” lets the Olive Oil within shine through the bottle without being covered up by unnecessary labels. Plus the golden coloring of the Olive Oil contrasts nicely with the white typography making this a solid design.

The overall typographic design used in this booklet is perfect for a restaurant nestled in Argentina. The handwritten typography really reflects the written specials that frequent many restaurants black boards. The use of black and white also contributes to the idea of black boards used to promote daily specials. While it is handwritten, the type does not look too sloppy or too boring. I believe that the designers achieved a good overall balance and readability.

The logo for “Masticar” on the front also has a handwritten style to it. When looking at it, without knowing, I really do feel as if the restaurant is located somewhere within South America. I believe that is because the type has a sense of culture and craft about it that I would relate to South America. The use of warm colors also contributes to that idea and they make the cover very inviting to the costumer.

Robot Food   |   http://robot-food.com

I really enjoy the typography and colors used in the design of this Rum bottle. The logo No.5 has a vintage and deco feel to it, which works great with the classical shape of the bottle. The light blue reflection behind the logo emphasizes the name and makes it stand out more to the viewer. The type above the logo is clean,capitalized, and bold which makes for easy reading and contrasts the cursive writing in the middle nicely. The wax stamp also contributes to the vintage design with the acronym RF being stamped directly onto the bottle.

The wooden black box is perfect for packaging this bottle. The light blue lines draw the viewers eyes directly to the logo and contrast perfectly with the black. All while keeping the vintage look and feel because hardly anything is sold in a wooden box to consumers.

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